VITAMINS FOR HEALTHY LIFE

VITAMINS FOR HEALTHY LIFE

VITAMINS FOR HEALTHY LIFE

Most health-conscious people have heard of magnesium (Mg), but many of them don't know a whole lot about it. Compared to other vitamins and minerals, it tends to fly under the radar. But, it's a vital nutrient that's essential for good health. You may remember magnesium from the periodic table of scientific elements that was posted in your middle school science classroom. It plays a critical role in metabolism, and the body uses it for more than 300 biochemical reactions. Those processes support your immune system, promote a healthy nervous
Vitamin A
Vitamin A is an antioxidant. It can come from plant or animal sources. Plant sources include colorful fruits and vegetables. Animal sources include liver and whole milk. Vitamin A is also added to foods like cereals.
Vegetarians, young children, and alcoholics may need extra Vitamin A. You might also need more if you have certain conditions, such as liver diseases, cystic fibrosis, and Crohn's disease. Check with your health care provider to see if you need to take vitamin A supplements.
Vitamin B
The B vitamins are
B1 (thiamine)
B2 (riboflavin)
B3 (niacin)
B5 (pantothenic acid)
B6
B7 (biotin)
B12
Folic acid
These vitamins help the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. They also help form red blood cells. You can get B vitamins from proteins such as fish, poultry, meat, eggs, and dairy products. Leafy green vegetables, beans, and peas also have B vitamins. Many cereals and some breads have added B vitamins.
Not getting enough of certain B vitamins can cause diseases. A lack of B12 or B6 can cause anemia.
 
Vitamin C
Vitamin C is an antioxidant. It is important for your skin, bones, and connective tissue. It promotes healing and helps the body absorb iron.
Vitamin C comes from fruits and vegetables. Good sources include citrus, red and green peppers, tomatoes, broccoli, and greens. Some juices and cereals have added vitamin C.
Some people may need extra vitamin C:
Pregnant/breastfeeding women
Smokers
People recovering from surgery
Burn victims
 
 
Vitamin D
Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Calcium is one of the main building blocks of bone. A lack of vitamin D can lead to bone diseases such as osteoporosis or rickets. Vitamin D also has a role in your nerve, muscle, and immune systems.
You can get vitamin D in three ways: through your skin, from your diet, and from supplements. Your body forms vitamin D naturally after exposure to sunlight. However, too much sun exposure can lead to skin aging and skin cancer. So many people try to get their vitamin D from other sources.
Vitamin D-rich foods include egg yolks, saltwater fish, and liver. Some other foods, like milk and cereal, often have added vitamin D.
You can also take vitamin D supplements. Check with your health care provider to see how much you should take. People who might need extra vitamin D include
Seniors
Breastfed infants
People with dark skin
People with certain conditions, such as liver diseases, cystic fibrosis and Crohn's disease
People who have obesity or have had gastric bypass surgery

Anxiety
Scientists have linked mental health conditions and neurological disorders that affect mood and memory to low magnesium levels. New research indicates that magnesium also protects the brain and nerve cells, preventing neurons from firing excessively, which scientists have linked to anxiety.
 
High Blood Pressure
Scientists have linked lower magnesium levels to hypertension (high blood pressure). Increasing your intake of magnesium and potassium can help promote normal blood pressure — and can even make other blood pressure-lowering strategies more effective
 
Sleep Issues
Low magnesium levels also affect sleep and interfere with the body's ability to produce sleep-enhancing hormones. When this happens, it can cause issues such as restless leg syndrome, sleep apnea, or insomnia. Magnesium also calms your nervous system, which helps you go to sleep in the first place.
 
Asthma
Studies show that people with asthma often have low magnesium levels. This deficiency — in addition to others, such as vitamin D — can even worsen asthma symptoms. Research shows that low magnesium levels correlate with more frequent asthma attacks.